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Old 06-20-2004, 02:16 PM   #1
Elizabeth Schott Elizabeth Schott is offline
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A question of space?




If you were moving to a new home that, at your wishes, trades square feet for acreage
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Old 06-20-2004, 02:33 PM   #2
Allan Rahbek Allan Rahbek is offline
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Beth,

How about dividing the living room by putting up a light wall made of battens and gypsum boards, fastened by a pair of screws. Just pick the best northern window and build a room around it. The wall can easily be taken down again.

Allan
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Old 06-20-2004, 02:39 PM   #3
Kimberly Dow Kimberly Dow is offline
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Beth, I just recently closed my downtown studio because we might be moving - plus it was getting to be a local artist hang-out - while that was fun and all; it really kept me from painting.

I moved my stuff into our diningroom and the table/chairs into an area of of livingroom. It fits nicely and I use the hutch for my magazines and supplies - plus there is a closet there to store supplies.

I was worried it wouldnt work well, I had a huge amount of space before. BUt, it is better than ever. I am staying more organized than ever - I really think before I buy more supplies also. The kids do not have to walk through there - they can go around to through the kitchen, but they are well-trained anyway to not touch or play around paintings. My husband was a bit annoyed at first because it looks like a studio if you walk in the house and look left, but.....ummm...too bad. I like the look of it - easels up with paintings in progress - it is very appealing to me. It works well also that I am at home again painting. I can stop and take a break and keep up on the laundry or whatever - when before I'd rush home at 4pm and have to run around like crazy to do dinner and help the kids with homework, etc.

If you can fit your studio in the middle of the living area - I say go for it. As long as the kids and animals know what they can and can't do - I think it's the best of both worlds. You can be working and still feel like you are spending time with the family. I can hear the TV when the kids/husband are watching a family program - so I am still part of the action - which lets me paint more. I could never spend this much time away from home painting.

Good luck!
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Old 06-20-2004, 05:12 PM   #4
Steven Sweeney Steven Sweeney is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elizabeth Schott
. . . and the lower is partially finished and will be filled with exercise equipment. What is one to do?
You can get rid of it on eBay.
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Old 06-20-2004, 06:40 PM   #5
Lynn T. McCallum Lynn T. McCallum is offline
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Artists All Need Space

Really! Get rid of the exercise equipment! Exercise that art muscle. You can always join a gym! Don't strain yourself throwing it out!

Don't cram yourself in a small space you are not happy with. You will stop painting. Listen to the voice of experience.

Another alternative is to build a small studio away from the house! There are a lot of plans out there on the Internet for small guest cottages with kitchens and baths. They are priced well and some even include labor on the price list.
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Old 06-20-2004, 11:21 PM   #6
Elizabeth Schott Elizabeth Schott is offline
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Thanks for the advise guys.

Steven, if you saw me you would think the equipment was gone already, but it won't be leaving. Plus I find it personally very hard to paint in a lower level. I don't have a problem with my computer office there, but I don't think I could paint, even with color corrected bulbs.

Allan the temporary walls would have been a great answer, but I'll attach an idea of the first floor so you see my dilemma (note these were taken with the current owners). I just don't think the walls would work.

Kim good points and Lynn I would love for a "little cottage in the woods"! Our builder friend said we needed to be there for at least 6 months before we think of were to add on, so I am just stuck hopefully for the short term, but I still thought it would be interesting to see how others have handled this problem.

I am so excited to move into this house next month, I love the light, but have made little too-scale games for moving objects around to try and get them to fit! It has been very frustrating.

I tried to draw a line to give you an idea of movement.

Thanks again.
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Old 06-20-2004, 11:42 PM   #7
Linda Brandon Linda Brandon is offline
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Hi Beth,

Take the living room! Take as many rooms as possible!
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Old 06-21-2004, 12:19 AM   #8
Garth Herrick Garth Herrick is offline
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Hi Beth,

What a great new house! If I were you, I would negotiate for the whole sunken living room as your studio space and set up a few zig-zag folding screens for privacy and separation from the staircase and entry hall. To help preserve the carpet, perhaps something like 4 x 8 sheets of 3/4 inch pressed wood panels could be tiled and taped together over the area you intend to place the easel (maybe with a plastic tarp spread beneath), to make a temporary hard smooth floor surface. Now you can paint and make a mess until you design another studio.

I am envious of your possibilities already. Next time I am out to visit my family farmstead just 2 miles east of Ohio (Rt 322 at the Pymatuning Reservoir), I may want to drive on out to see what you are up to in your stunning new studio.

Congratulations,

Garth
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Old 06-21-2004, 12:35 AM   #9
Lynn T. McCallum Lynn T. McCallum is offline
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Women, We Want Nice ~ Men, They Only Want Pratical

If you are like me Beth! We think Garth had a great idea but we want things to look nice especially in a house that is new to us. So here is my advice and no hard feelings men! An inexpensive Oriental/Persian rug from Sam's or Cosco beneath you as you paint would be nice and kind to the feet and legs. I couldn't help but notice the hard looking floors in your living room. A couple of space rugs like the above mentioned under your feet will help to buffer the hard floor and if you drop or splatter paint it will blend in with the rug if you pick out a busy and dark enough rug. Another reason for picking out darker rugs would be so that you don't have a bunch of light and colors bouncing around while you are trying to paint Hope that helps!
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Old 06-21-2004, 01:02 AM   #10
Marvin Mattelson Marvin Mattelson is offline
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Beth, congratulation on your new digs. The space and light look great. If I were you I would refrain from making any plans until you move in. Try working in different areas and see what feels the most comfortable before committing. Maybe you should consider buying a book on Feng Shui. Good luck.
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