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Old 05-12-2005, 10:44 PM   #11
Lon Haverly Lon Haverly is offline
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Degas




He was considered a master unsurpassed. This sketch is very bold in the coat, and very timid and sensitive in the face.

This style of drawing at one time was considered traditional. Paul Calle mentions in his writings that he started out in the more "traditional" method of drawing, with the shade lines all parallel from the upper right with less regard to the contour of the form. Then he gradually changed to the contoured lines which follow the contours of the form, changing in direction.

His reference to more "traditional drawing" perked my attention. It seems that the traditional methods that I learned have vanished. They have slipped off into oblivion it seems, lost to this generation.
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Old 01-05-2010, 03:48 AM   #12
Eva Teng Eva Teng is offline
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I agree with you completely! For the first 2~3 years of my drawing and painting lessons, I was taught to copy from photographs exactly. And I did it exceedingly well, but it took so much time and effort. And yes, my personality/air failed to show through any of those works.

Now, I have a new art teacher who teaches me exactly what you have just said. Well actually he puts the order of importance like this: point > line > plane. So getting the right, precise point is more important than line, which is more important than plane (sorry if plane is not the right word... what I mean is like, the shaded bits). And his way (also yours) IS a lot faster.

Thanks for sharing this with us all! And I love Paul Kalle's works.
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Old 01-05-2010, 09:41 AM   #13
Lon Haverly Lon Haverly is offline
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Points

Points would only apply to construct lines, not lines which are part of a mass. Point to point sounds like he connects the dots. That is a weak way to draw. The dot needs to be in your head, not on the paper. The line needs to happen spontaneously. It comes with practice.
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Old 01-10-2010, 03:59 PM   #14
Steven Sweeney Steven Sweeney is offline
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In pencil and charcoal, I've been forever grateful for discovering the dark accent and the powerful effect such a small effort has on the overall piece.

I find the black sliver of shadow on the cheek, under the middle finger, to be an anchor in this piece as strong as the eyes. I find that value shape to be the most important--actually, perhaps the only "value shape"--in the drawing.
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Old 01-10-2010, 04:57 PM   #15
Allan Rahbek Allan Rahbek is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lon Haverly
Point to point sounds like he connects the dots. That is a weak way to draw.
Lon,
Eva could be referring to "placement". It would make sense to emphasize precise drawing over line and plane, i think.
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